News ID : 56199
Publish Date : 2020/11/01 07:47
The growth of China's soft power components and the decline of American hegemonic power
BY: Hadi Ajili / Mehdi Khorsand

The growth of China's soft power components and the decline of American hegemonic power


Perhaps the most important consequence of the current financial crisis is the delegitimization of US global power. People around the world who considered the United States to be the most modern, complex, and productive economy in the world now see the United States as the most unstable country in the world. Even some analysts, such as Richard Haas, have a more pessimistic view of the effects of the economic crisis on US global power, calling the crisis the beginning of the end of America's "monopoly power" and putting the world today on the brink of "non-polarity."

NOURNEWS - Despite all the optimism that critics of the decline of the United States have of power, China has always been a major concern. Critics say that while China pursues ambitious plans to modernize its navy, it poses an ambiguous and long-term threat to US hegemony in the Pacific, but it is unlikely that China will use force to resolve border issues with its neighbors or annex Taiwan. . There is no convincing reason that the US deterrent force, the speed of action of the Seventh Fleet in the face of any threat from the Pacific, and China's neighbors' willingness to intervene to maintain US stability and balance in the region could not deter China from pursuing aggressive policies. From their point of view, the emergence of new threats does not diminish the importance of US military power. Because although such threats cannot be eliminated by military means, this restriction also applies to other countries. On the other hand, as international politics continues to revolve around countries, having a large and efficient military force designed to protect national security and interests is an advantage for any country.

Perhaps the most important consequence of the current financial crisis is the delegitimization of US global power. People around the world who considered the United States to be the most modern, complex, and productive economy in the world now see the United States as the most unstable country in the world. Even some analysts, such as Richard Haas, have a more pessimistic view of the effects of the economic crisis on US global power, calling the crisis the beginning of the end of America's "monopoly power" and putting the world today on the brink of "non-polarity." But China, with its vast territory and one-fifth of the world's population, is the world's largest developing country, and in addition to being a permanent member of the Security Council and having a veto, it is also one of the world's major nuclear powers. It is also the world's second largest exporter of energy and the second largest consumer of energy, and is projected to become the world's largest economy by 2025, surpassing the United States. But China's progress in most economic and military spheres, which has led to significant manifestations of political and economic challenges between the United States and the United States, as well as the emergence of a new superpower in the first half of the 21st century, indicates a decline in power. It is relative to the United States in various economic, political and military spheres.

China and the United States have had relations for five periods throughout history. In the first period, ideological conflict and strategic rivalry (1949-1972) in general, the two countries' view of each other is influenced by ideological issues and strategic rivalries, hostile and hated. The first US-China contact during this period was the Korean War (1950), in which 200,000 Chinese troops attacked US and UN forces and pushed them back 38 degrees. Finally, a peace treaty was signed in 1953 between the representatives of China and North Korea on the one hand and the United States on the other.

In the second period, the attempt to resolve disputes (1972-1989), the first formal relations between the two countries are established. The visit of US President Richard Nixon on February 21, 1972, and his meeting with Mao and Chuen marked a major turning point in the two countries' foreign relations. According to Kissinger, Richard Nixon and Mao Zedong resumed diplomatic contacts in 1971 and 1972, not because American and Chinese ideologies were more compatible, but because of geopolitical imperatives.

In the third period; Expansion of Economic Relations (1989-2001) the political and psychological basis of constructive relations between China and the United States gradually weakened. But while the Clinton administration has actually strengthened economic ties with China by supporting WTO membership and establishing normal trade relations with that country; but he never provided a rational and convincing geopolitical reason for his actions.

 

In the fourth period; Confidence Building (2001-2010) US-China relations during this period were affected by the events of September 11, 2001 in the United States. This incident was a turning point that, in addition to influencing US foreign policy toward the Middle East, led to the formation of a new chapter in international relations and international relations.

 

In the fifth period; In the era of strategic competition (2010-2025), the Americans in their new doctrine have considered controlling China to prevent it from becoming a regional hegemon. We then see that China's policy on regional and global issues differs significantly from that of the United States, as exemplified by the Iranian nuclear issue and the Syrian crisis.

There are many reasons for the failure of US foreign policy to maintain a global superpower, some of the most important of which are: The ill-advised policies of the US have led, in some cases, weak countries to resist. The US dictatorial approach will push other countries to unite more for their own interests. For example, China's rapprochement with Russia has been partly due to Washington's policies. A dictatorial approach prevents the formation of a stronger coalition to strengthen US diplomatic power and influence. Even US allies do not like their interests to be belittled. The figures show a decline in the US share of the global economy. For example, according to World Bank statistics, the US share of GDP at the end of 2017 was 24.08 percent, and its closest rival, China, had a share of 15.40 percent. At the end of 1968, however, the US share was 37.30 percent. In particular, regional and trans-regional powers are emerging and strengthening; Powers that can no longer be decided at regional and global levels without regard to them. China's rise to power has also affected the US hegemonic position and accelerated the decline of the United States as the United States faces a number of international crises.


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